… [Tavi]Gevinson and [Ira] Glass’s generation-straddling friendship began when they were introduced through Glass’s wife, Anaheed Alani, who is now Rookie’s story editor. As a media veteran himself, Glass acted as a sort of protector for Rookie, encouraging Gevinson, now 16, to pursue sole ownership and helping her to navigate industry perils….

fuckyeahshortguys:

Johnny Galecki- 5’5”

This image is absolutely tragic. A short celebrity, obviously dressed by a stylist (albeit an absolutely clueless one), wearing a sample suit that is much too large for him, thus making him look much shorter. Either that, or the Big Bang Theory isn’t paying this guy and he was reducing to buying a terrible off-the-rack suit from Men’s Warehouse. However, Galecki is not alone, as most short men don’t know how a suit is supposed to fit and often end up wearing “regular” sized suits that are much too large for them.
With his arms at this position, the sleeve hems should end at the wrist bone. There’s about two, maybe even two and a half, inches of excess fabric there. He would appear much taller if the length was correct. If you’re a short guy, above all else, you want to make certain that your sleeve length is correct. Otherwise you’ll look like a kid wearing a suit that he’s supposed to “grow into.”
While the length of the jacket itself is about right, the width of the shoulders is much too large. Notice the sharp angle at the shoulders. This is caused by the shoulder pads extending beyond the end of his shoulder. This can usually be solved by removing the pads, but ideally you want to pads to end where your shoulders end.
The shoulders are the first tell-tale sign that he’s wearing a designer’s sample intended for a much taller and rakish model. The second is the fact that he had the jacket completely unbuttoned, because he appears to have a bit of a gut going on. 
The next tell-tale sign that working on the Big Bang Theory doesn’t pay is that it appears Galecki ran to the premiere after getting off of his day job as a painter, because he still has a hideous pair of boots on and neglected to tuck in his shirt. 
While it might be a consequence of his ugly-ass boots, the “break” in his pants is actually a mound of gathered fabric. The break refers to the point where the pant legs and your shoes meet, which should leave nothing more than a “wrinkle” at this angle. While it’s entirely possible that his pants are hammed correctly for actual shoes, it’s also possible that he’s wearing pants that are just too long. Either way, the gathering points to the latter, which makes him look even shorter his 5’ 5”. 
Short cut suits are very difficult to find at any price point. And often when you do find them, they’re cut for overweight men. While made-to-measure suits are coming down in price every few months thanks to increased competition, advances in manufacturing technology and cheap labour in China, odds are that unless you have the money for a Ralph Lauren Black Label suit (the best off-the-rack short cuts, hands down) you’re going to need to find a close regular fit off-the-rack and then take it to a tailor to make the necessary alterations.
Regular cuts are made for men 5’ 9” to 6’ 3”, however if you’re just shy of average height some regular cuts might fit your body very well. I’m 5’ 7” and 36R jackets from H&M, Mexx, Banana Republic & Ralph Lauren Black Label fit me better than short cuts from Hugo Boss, Brooks Brothers, Calvin Klein and just about every short cut at chain suit stores.  

fuckyeahshortguys:

Johnny Galecki- 5’5”

This image is absolutely tragic. A short celebrity, obviously dressed by a stylist (albeit an absolutely clueless one), wearing a sample suit that is much too large for him, thus making him look much shorter. Either that, or the Big Bang Theory isn’t paying this guy and he was reducing to buying a terrible off-the-rack suit from Men’s Warehouse. However, Galecki is not alone, as most short men don’t know how a suit is supposed to fit and often end up wearing “regular” sized suits that are much too large for them.

With his arms at this position, the sleeve hems should end at the wrist bone. There’s about two, maybe even two and a half, inches of excess fabric there. He would appear much taller if the length was correct. If you’re a short guy, above all else, you want to make certain that your sleeve length is correct. Otherwise you’ll look like a kid wearing a suit that he’s supposed to “grow into.”

While the length of the jacket itself is about right, the width of the shoulders is much too large. Notice the sharp angle at the shoulders. This is caused by the shoulder pads extending beyond the end of his shoulder. This can usually be solved by removing the pads, but ideally you want to pads to end where your shoulders end.

The shoulders are the first tell-tale sign that he’s wearing a designer’s sample intended for a much taller and rakish model. The second is the fact that he had the jacket completely unbuttoned, because he appears to have a bit of a gut going on. 

The next tell-tale sign that working on the Big Bang Theory doesn’t pay is that it appears Galecki ran to the premiere after getting off of his day job as a painter, because he still has a hideous pair of boots on and neglected to tuck in his shirt. 

While it might be a consequence of his ugly-ass boots, the “break” in his pants is actually a mound of gathered fabric. The break refers to the point where the pant legs and your shoes meet, which should leave nothing more than a “wrinkle” at this angle. While it’s entirely possible that his pants are hammed correctly for actual shoes, it’s also possible that he’s wearing pants that are just too long. Either way, the gathering points to the latter, which makes him look even shorter his 5’ 5”. 

Short cut suits are very difficult to find at any price point. And often when you do find them, they’re cut for overweight men. While made-to-measure suits are coming down in price every few months thanks to increased competition, advances in manufacturing technology and cheap labour in China, odds are that unless you have the money for a Ralph Lauren Black Label suit (the best off-the-rack short cuts, hands down) you’re going to need to find a close regular fit off-the-rack and then take it to a tailor to make the necessary alterations.

Regular cuts are made for men 5’ 9” to 6’ 3”, however if you’re just shy of average height some regular cuts might fit your body very well. I’m 5’ 7” and 36R jackets from H&M, Mexx, Banana Republic & Ralph Lauren Black Label fit me better than short cuts from Hugo Boss, Brooks Brothers, Calvin Klein and just about every short cut at chain suit stores.  

Club Monaco: Made in America promo video

An oft repeated myth coming from the mouths of professional chatterboxes is that the US “no longer makes things.” Little to do they know, the US is actually the world’s leading manufacturer of finished goods. Here’s the rub, the US is so good at making “things” that they specialize in making highly advanced “things” as efficiently as possible, so while they don’t employ armies of low skilled workers making enough to own the entitlements/trappings of a middle-class life, they do employ a small force of highly skilled people who earn very good wages.

This line appears to cater to this anxiety over American manufacturing, which has me wondering if we’re all economic nationalists now.

As a former Club Monaco shareholder — who dumped his shares in favour of riskier, pre-bubble tech stock [which, for the most part, I don’t regret]) — I think that I can answer this.

When Club Monaco was a publicly traded company, it was under constant shareholder pressure to make money (obviously) and in keeping with the business zeitgeist of the mid-90s, focused on building the value of the brand and controlling manufacturing costs. As a public company, it was quite clear that the plan was to build the brand and the company to point where one of the mega-brand stables would come along to purchase everything, lock, stock and barrel, and perhaps take the company private. That effectively happened when the company was purchased by Polo Ralph Lauren, because while the company is publicly traded, nearly all of the preferred stock is owned by Ralph Lauren himself so he maintains control over the company.

When you’re a publicly traded company, you don’t have anywhere near the amount of leeway to go against the grain than you would as a private one. Telling shareholders that you’re going to experiment with domestic manufacturing at a time when companies are moving production from one country to another just to save two-cents per piece is pretty much an invitation for shareholders to move their money to other investments.

The times and consumer preferences have changed, and businesses now see that there’s a market for premium priced goods that bank on being domestically produced. Sort of like how fools pay extra for “organic” fruit and vegetables.

Categories: reblog, fashion, club monaco, canada,
via putthison
Here’s an outfit from Club Monaco’s fall men’s collection.
I love everything shown here, with the exceptions of those pants. Somewhere a stylist needs to be fired for thinking that sweatpants 1) could ever be worn with a trench and knit sweater and 2) that it’s acceptable to wear sweatpants in public without feeling even the slightest bit of shame.
Even chinos would be a better choice, just anything other than cuffed, “I’ve given up on life” pants. 

Here’s an outfit from Club Monaco’s fall men’s collection.

I love everything shown here, with the exceptions of those pants. Somewhere a stylist needs to be fired for thinking that sweatpants 1) could ever be worn with a trench and knit sweater and 2) that it’s acceptable to wear sweatpants in public without feeling even the slightest bit of shame.

Even chinos would be a better choice, just anything other than cuffed, “I’ve given up on life” pants. 

"No comment"
I’m really feeling this t-shirt, and I’m not really a t-shirt person anymore. Too bad it’s only available from GAP’s American website.
When I was about nineteen, I had the opportunity to train as a boom mic operator in Ottawa. I never did it, but my parents still harangue me about being a “lowly stick holder.”

"No comment"

I’m really feeling this t-shirt, and I’m not really a t-shirt person anymore. Too bad it’s only available from GAP’s American website.

When I was about nineteen, I had the opportunity to train as a boom mic operator in Ottawa. I never did it, but my parents still harangue me about being a “lowly stick holder.”

Clothing retailer Joe Fresh says it’s planning to open 20 standalone stores in Canada, including its first mall-based locations.

The brand, which is currently sold through Loblaw Cos. Ltd. superstores, said it will open four of these stores this year, including three in the Greater Toronto Area.

The company defined “standalone” as stores that are not within or adjacent to a Loblaw store.

* * *

The first mall-based store will open in late March in Heartland Town Centre in Mississauga.

It will be followed by one in Bramalea City Centre in mid April, one in Vaughan Mills in late May, along with one in CrossIron Mills, in Rocky View, just north of Calgary, in early May.

While I can’t comment on the women’s collection, I just hope that this endeavour is buttressed with an increase in quality and styling. The introductory collection was great — I treasure my “mod” peacoat — but I’ve noticed a steady decline in their menswear over the years.

My mind immediately turns to the puffy nylon that was used in the line’s “tech” blazers for about three seasons. I know of someone who purchase one to wear to a job interview, while en route to the interview no less, only to have the person conducting the interview ask if he was wearing a Halloween costume.     

I wonder if they’ll take PC Points?

Categories: reblog, fashion, talking shop,