I can’t find the expiration date on this, but I finally finished it and  I’m anxious to get it processed. Despite taking my SLR to Greece with  me, I didn’t shoot a single frame, so I’m worried that all of the x-rays  might have torched the unused exposures. The last time that that camera  went through x-ray machines, my family’s entire trip to Yugoslavia was  lost. Then again, that was in the 1980s and completely insane Communist  and RCMP officers were totally freaked out by the sight of a kick ass  Pentax electro-spottie.

I can’t find the expiration date on this, but I finally finished it and I’m anxious to get it processed. Despite taking my SLR to Greece with me, I didn’t shoot a single frame, so I’m worried that all of the x-rays might have torched the unused exposures. The last time that that camera went through x-ray machines, my family’s entire trip to Yugoslavia was lost. Then again, that was in the 1980s and completely insane Communist and RCMP officers were totally freaked out by the sight of a kick ass Pentax electro-spottie.

I’m fascinated by the Lomokino 35mm(-ish) motion picture lomo camera. The footage that it produces is captivating, but I’m wary of both processing and the cost of acquisition. One of the great things about shooting to tape, and increasingly flash storage, is the low cost of shooting. Unless you’re on a strict shooting schedule, you can burn up as much tape or memory as you want without having to keep an accountant at your side. Film is a totally different story.

In college I became consumed by achieving the “look of film” and being an “authentic” filmmaker that I bought a cheap Super 8 camera at a garage sale and an expense roll of film from the campus shop and went around campus shooting a test film. Nearly $300 later, over half of which was processing, I had nothing but an underexposed spool of something resembling the intro to the Wonder Years.

The aura of motion picture film is fantasical, but it doesn’t fit my budget.

These are two of the jobs that undocumented migrant workers are supposedly stealing from hardworking, native-born Greeks.
Posing for photos with tourists from countries with very few people of visibly different races and ethnicities. The going rate is about three Euro, but the darker ones skin is the more Euros one can command.
This is work that’s usually done to supplement the primary economic activity of many undocumented migrants, which is selling counterfeit luxury goods, such as handbags, sunglasses and watches, on behalf of organized crime. The risks involved are pretty low, as long as the people providing the goods have bribed the police to look the other way.

These are two of the jobs that undocumented migrant workers are supposedly stealing from hardworking, native-born Greeks.

Posing for photos with tourists from countries with very few people of visibly different races and ethnicities. The going rate is about three Euro, but the darker ones skin is the more Euros one can command.

This is work that’s usually done to supplement the primary economic activity of many undocumented migrants, which is selling counterfeit luxury goods, such as handbags, sunglasses and watches, on behalf of organized crime. The risks involved are pretty low, as long as the people providing the goods have bribed the police to look the other way.