gqfashion:

Menswear Trends from Vegas: Tennis Whites

So basically the new trend in menswear is the stuff that I wore in my first year of university — lame.

gqfashion:

Menswear Trends from Vegas: Tennis Whites

So basically the new trend in menswear is the stuff that I wore in my first year of university — lame.

via gqfashion
No, no one “needs” these pants. These pants combine two of the most horrific developments in men’s fashion — cargo shorts and “zipper legs” — and attempt to sell them as neo-prep when they’re pure Juggalo.

No, no one “needs” these pants. These pants combine two of the most horrific developments in men’s fashion — cargo shorts and “zipper legs” — and attempt to sell them as neo-prep when they’re pure Juggalo.

fuckyeahshortguys:

Johnny Galecki- 5’5”

This image is absolutely tragic. A short celebrity, obviously dressed by a stylist (albeit an absolutely clueless one), wearing a sample suit that is much too large for him, thus making him look much shorter. Either that, or the Big Bang Theory isn’t paying this guy and he was reducing to buying a terrible off-the-rack suit from Men’s Warehouse. However, Galecki is not alone, as most short men don’t know how a suit is supposed to fit and often end up wearing “regular” sized suits that are much too large for them.
With his arms at this position, the sleeve hems should end at the wrist bone. There’s about two, maybe even two and a half, inches of excess fabric there. He would appear much taller if the length was correct. If you’re a short guy, above all else, you want to make certain that your sleeve length is correct. Otherwise you’ll look like a kid wearing a suit that he’s supposed to “grow into.”
While the length of the jacket itself is about right, the width of the shoulders is much too large. Notice the sharp angle at the shoulders. This is caused by the shoulder pads extending beyond the end of his shoulder. This can usually be solved by removing the pads, but ideally you want to pads to end where your shoulders end.
The shoulders are the first tell-tale sign that he’s wearing a designer’s sample intended for a much taller and rakish model. The second is the fact that he had the jacket completely unbuttoned, because he appears to have a bit of a gut going on. 
The next tell-tale sign that working on the Big Bang Theory doesn’t pay is that it appears Galecki ran to the premiere after getting off of his day job as a painter, because he still has a hideous pair of boots on and neglected to tuck in his shirt. 
While it might be a consequence of his ugly-ass boots, the “break” in his pants is actually a mound of gathered fabric. The break refers to the point where the pant legs and your shoes meet, which should leave nothing more than a “wrinkle” at this angle. While it’s entirely possible that his pants are hammed correctly for actual shoes, it’s also possible that he’s wearing pants that are just too long. Either way, the gathering points to the latter, which makes him look even shorter his 5’ 5”. 
Short cut suits are very difficult to find at any price point. And often when you do find them, they’re cut for overweight men. While made-to-measure suits are coming down in price every few months thanks to increased competition, advances in manufacturing technology and cheap labour in China, odds are that unless you have the money for a Ralph Lauren Black Label suit (the best off-the-rack short cuts, hands down) you’re going to need to find a close regular fit off-the-rack and then take it to a tailor to make the necessary alterations.
Regular cuts are made for men 5’ 9” to 6’ 3”, however if you’re just shy of average height some regular cuts might fit your body very well. I’m 5’ 7” and 36R jackets from H&M, Mexx, Banana Republic & Ralph Lauren Black Label fit me better than short cuts from Hugo Boss, Brooks Brothers, Calvin Klein and just about every short cut at chain suit stores.  

fuckyeahshortguys:

Johnny Galecki- 5’5”

This image is absolutely tragic. A short celebrity, obviously dressed by a stylist (albeit an absolutely clueless one), wearing a sample suit that is much too large for him, thus making him look much shorter. Either that, or the Big Bang Theory isn’t paying this guy and he was reducing to buying a terrible off-the-rack suit from Men’s Warehouse. However, Galecki is not alone, as most short men don’t know how a suit is supposed to fit and often end up wearing “regular” sized suits that are much too large for them.

With his arms at this position, the sleeve hems should end at the wrist bone. There’s about two, maybe even two and a half, inches of excess fabric there. He would appear much taller if the length was correct. If you’re a short guy, above all else, you want to make certain that your sleeve length is correct. Otherwise you’ll look like a kid wearing a suit that he’s supposed to “grow into.”

While the length of the jacket itself is about right, the width of the shoulders is much too large. Notice the sharp angle at the shoulders. This is caused by the shoulder pads extending beyond the end of his shoulder. This can usually be solved by removing the pads, but ideally you want to pads to end where your shoulders end.

The shoulders are the first tell-tale sign that he’s wearing a designer’s sample intended for a much taller and rakish model. The second is the fact that he had the jacket completely unbuttoned, because he appears to have a bit of a gut going on. 

The next tell-tale sign that working on the Big Bang Theory doesn’t pay is that it appears Galecki ran to the premiere after getting off of his day job as a painter, because he still has a hideous pair of boots on and neglected to tuck in his shirt. 

While it might be a consequence of his ugly-ass boots, the “break” in his pants is actually a mound of gathered fabric. The break refers to the point where the pant legs and your shoes meet, which should leave nothing more than a “wrinkle” at this angle. While it’s entirely possible that his pants are hammed correctly for actual shoes, it’s also possible that he’s wearing pants that are just too long. Either way, the gathering points to the latter, which makes him look even shorter his 5’ 5”. 

Short cut suits are very difficult to find at any price point. And often when you do find them, they’re cut for overweight men. While made-to-measure suits are coming down in price every few months thanks to increased competition, advances in manufacturing technology and cheap labour in China, odds are that unless you have the money for a Ralph Lauren Black Label suit (the best off-the-rack short cuts, hands down) you’re going to need to find a close regular fit off-the-rack and then take it to a tailor to make the necessary alterations.

Regular cuts are made for men 5’ 9” to 6’ 3”, however if you’re just shy of average height some regular cuts might fit your body very well. I’m 5’ 7” and 36R jackets from H&M, Mexx, Banana Republic & Ralph Lauren Black Label fit me better than short cuts from Hugo Boss, Brooks Brothers, Calvin Klein and just about every short cut at chain suit stores.  

gqfashion:

Fresh Picks From Joe Fresh
Canadian import Joe Fresh recently landed in NYC and offers an impressive lineup of pieces we want at even more impressive prices, like this crew neck sweater that comes in at a cool $29. Here’s what else to get.

Actually, the Joe Fresh section at the Newmarket the Canadian Superstore has a couple of these on clearance for $10 a shot. I thought about, I even tried it on, but it’s just not my style. 

gqfashion:

Fresh Picks From Joe Fresh

Canadian import Joe Fresh recently landed in NYC and offers an impressive lineup of pieces we want at even more impressive prices, like this crew neck sweater that comes in at a cool $29. Here’s what else to get.

Actually, the Joe Fresh section at the Newmarket the Canadian Superstore has a couple of these on clearance for $10 a shot. I thought about, I even tried it on, but it’s just not my style. 

via gqfashion

According the GQ Eye, today Urban Outfitters will launch a made-to-measure suit shop on their website. While the site isn’t live as of this writing, the promo video above has piqued my interest.

For a gender that is conditioned to take no pleasure in shopping for clothing, suit shopping can be a challenge for men who are unfamiliar with how a suit should fit and how the salespeople in suit shops operate. For those who know suits, finding what fits both their body and tastes can be a nightmare.

Going to Tip Top or International Clothiers with a few hundred bucks in your pocket will undoubtedly see you walking out with a suit that wears you, David Byrne-style, and is cut to the tastes of unfashionable dinosaurs. That’s because stores pay bonuses to their staff on sales and mostly stock suits between forty-two and fifty regular, so they’d sell you a garage bag with arm holds cut into it and tell you that you look great in it just to make a sale.

Thankfully for myself, I’m so jaded and informed that a salesperson’s well timed “that looks really good on you” the very second I’ve slipped on a high margin jacket doesn’t sway me.

I think that it’s this experience and lack of choice that has driven the burgeoning market for mass made-to-measure menswear. However, I don’t think that any of the existing players are offering much that gets their potential customers excited. What I’m seeing the video looks a lot more daring and becoming of the hipster aesthetic than anything that the biggest name in the game, Indochino, has put out. If UO can even come closing to matching their level of customer service — I’m not so hot on the product, but found the customer service to be outstanding —, we might actually have a competition to watch.

Club Monaco: Made in America promo video

An oft repeated myth coming from the mouths of professional chatterboxes is that the US “no longer makes things.” Little to do they know, the US is actually the world’s leading manufacturer of finished goods. Here’s the rub, the US is so good at making “things” that they specialize in making highly advanced “things” as efficiently as possible, so while they don’t employ armies of low skilled workers making enough to own the entitlements/trappings of a middle-class life, they do employ a small force of highly skilled people who earn very good wages.

This line appears to cater to this anxiety over American manufacturing, which has me wondering if we’re all economic nationalists now.

Here’s an outfit from Club Monaco’s fall men’s collection.
I love everything shown here, with the exceptions of those pants. Somewhere a stylist needs to be fired for thinking that sweatpants 1) could ever be worn with a trench and knit sweater and 2) that it’s acceptable to wear sweatpants in public without feeling even the slightest bit of shame.
Even chinos would be a better choice, just anything other than cuffed, “I’ve given up on life” pants. 

Here’s an outfit from Club Monaco’s fall men’s collection.

I love everything shown here, with the exceptions of those pants. Somewhere a stylist needs to be fired for thinking that sweatpants 1) could ever be worn with a trench and knit sweater and 2) that it’s acceptable to wear sweatpants in public without feeling even the slightest bit of shame.

Even chinos would be a better choice, just anything other than cuffed, “I’ve given up on life” pants. 

The High-Low Theory of Fashion Affordability (via Esquire)
I was critical at first, but this Venn diagram is about right.
I’m the furtherest thing from brand conscious when it comes to style — a holdover trait from my punk rock youth, I would assume — but I like to make sure that my “investment wardrobe”, meaning the clothing and accessories that I intend to keep for years, is priced accordingly as this usually translates to higher quality. However, I differ on shoes. Because, like a commuter vehicle, shoes are not an investment.
With the exception of the gym and cycling, I haven’t worn anything but dress shoes since my twenty-fourth birthday. I have one pair of Aldo slim loafers that I occasionally wear whenever I can’t muster the patience to tie my shoes (don’t scoff, you have those sorts of days as well, I’m sure of it), and one pair of really great Banana Republic dress shoes that cost me a small fortune a few years ago, but I usually wear Dr. Scholl’s. The quality of the leather is only passable and needs to be polished frequently, the false stitching on the rubber sole isn’t the slightest bit convincing and the designs can be weird. In terms of utility and durability, they’re somewhere between a work boot and a dress shoe. I don’t work a desk job, I’m on my feet for nine hours straight each day, and so any other dress shoe would be impractical. That’s exactly what the memory foam and gel insoles, depending on the shoe, are for — standing and fast walking. And at about thirty-dollars a pair, sometimes five-dollars if you’re a savvy enough shopper, it doesn’t burn me to scuff them up too much and have them fall apart after a few months. 
I actually prefer cheap polos/golf shirts to more expensive ones, because the material is so much lighter. The only caveat about these cheaper polos is that material can easily become perforated and the collars are much flimsier than what you’d expect to find on a good quality golf shirt. Once again, these are so inexpensive now that you can afford to toss them once they become too ratty. To plug the brand again, Joe Fresh’s spring/summer line has consistently fit this bill and offers a respectable range of colours.  

The High-Low Theory of Fashion Affordability (via Esquire)

I was critical at first, but this Venn diagram is about right.

I’m the furtherest thing from brand conscious when it comes to style — a holdover trait from my punk rock youth, I would assume — but I like to make sure that my “investment wardrobe”, meaning the clothing and accessories that I intend to keep for years, is priced accordingly as this usually translates to higher quality. However, I differ on shoes. Because, like a commuter vehicle, shoes are not an investment.

With the exception of the gym and cycling, I haven’t worn anything but dress shoes since my twenty-fourth birthday. I have one pair of Aldo slim loafers that I occasionally wear whenever I can’t muster the patience to tie my shoes (don’t scoff, you have those sorts of days as well, I’m sure of it), and one pair of really great Banana Republic dress shoes that cost me a small fortune a few years ago, but I usually wear Dr. Scholl’s. The quality of the leather is only passable and needs to be polished frequently, the false stitching on the rubber sole isn’t the slightest bit convincing and the designs can be weird. In terms of utility and durability, they’re somewhere between a work boot and a dress shoe. I don’t work a desk job, I’m on my feet for nine hours straight each day, and so any other dress shoe would be impractical. That’s exactly what the memory foam and gel insoles, depending on the shoe, are for — standing and fast walking. And at about thirty-dollars a pair, sometimes five-dollars if you’re a savvy enough shopper, it doesn’t burn me to scuff them up too much and have them fall apart after a few months. 

I actually prefer cheap polos/golf shirts to more expensive ones, because the material is so much lighter. The only caveat about these cheaper polos is that material can easily become perforated and the collars are much flimsier than what you’d expect to find on a good quality golf shirt. Once again, these are so inexpensive now that you can afford to toss them once they become too ratty. To plug the brand again, Joe Fresh’s spring/summer line has consistently fit this bill and offers a respectable range of colours.  

"No comment"
I’m really feeling this t-shirt, and I’m not really a t-shirt person anymore. Too bad it’s only available from GAP’s American website.
When I was about nineteen, I had the opportunity to train as a boom mic operator in Ottawa. I never did it, but my parents still harangue me about being a “lowly stick holder.”

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I’m really feeling this t-shirt, and I’m not really a t-shirt person anymore. Too bad it’s only available from GAP’s American website.

When I was about nineteen, I had the opportunity to train as a boom mic operator in Ottawa. I never did it, but my parents still harangue me about being a “lowly stick holder.”